Priofessional Desktop and Speech recognition Microphones

Philips SpeechMike Microphones

Grundig Digta SonicMic III Information

Olympus Directrec Desktop Dictation Microphones

Desktop Dictation and Speech Recognition

For Speech recognition users, a dedicated desktop microphone is a must.  You will see your productivity and accuracy increase dramatically.  Easily programmable buttons let the user control nearly any program or function. (I use a couple for copy / paste functions – you will be amazed what a time saver that is)  These microphones are designed with noise cancelling technology and are built and calibrated specifically for use with speech recognition programs such as Dragon NaturallySpeaking.

Using an EMR / EHR or CMS system such as Time Matters?  This is where the desktop dictation microphone shines.  With in hand mouse and cursor control, you are no longer fumbling with the keyboard, mouse and headset to use Dragon speech recognition programs.

The accuracy and productivity gains make these handheld microphones the best option for Dragon.

For straight up, old school dictation, in many environments, professionals find it easier to do their dictation at their desk or dedicated workstation. In those cases, authors can benefit from the high-fidelity and added functionality of today’s digital desktop recorders.

 

How it Works

Using a desktop microphone with Dragon is as simple as plugging it in. Train your profile with the source USB microphone, and you are off to the races with the most accurate, technologically advanced input device available.  Whatever anyone tells you, nothing beats a dictation  microphone for accuracy.  it is what they were designed to do.

Unlike handheld digital recorders, desktop microphones can also create a digital voice file directly on your computer as you dictate. While this limits your portability, it does provide you with the highest recording fidelity as well as you give you additional flexibility to:

  • Use speech recognition software in real time to create documents and control your PC.
  • Input bar codes or other demographic information directly into your voice file.
  • Control your PC mouse as you dictate (depending on recorder model).

Microphone Brands

Philips SpeechMikes

Once an innovation, now an industry standard, the line of SpeechMikes from Philips continued to be a favored choice among professionals.  Antimicrobial, and ergonomic, these are at the top of the heap.

New from Philips, the SpeechMike Air, a Bluetooth wireless solution with a 33 foot range. Never be tethered again!

Philips Professional SpeechMikes

Grundig Digta SonicMic Microphones

If you look into the history of high quality audio, Grundig stands out.  German engineered since 1945 they dominate the European market. The June 2015 launch of the Digta SonicMic 3 ushered in a new standard for quality at a price too low to believe.

Grundig Digta SonicMic Microphones

Olympus Directrec Microphones

Expanding on their experience in digital voice recording, Olympus introduced the affordable, user friendly DR-2200 slide switch and DR-1200 push button Direct Rec microphones

Olympus Professional DR DirectRec Microphones

Which one is best?

The answer to this is fairly simple.  if you have used Olympus or Philips in the past and are integrating or familiar with their software, stick with what you know. It will allow you to avoid the learning curve and get right to the productivity increase.

The next consideration is slide switch or push button. Given the option, I choose the slide switch every time.  It is tactile, you do not have to look at it to make sure you pushed the correct button to toggle on or off the Dragon microphone.  This alone increases confidence and productivity.  It is also more durable.  Pushing an electronic contact over and over will indefinitely wear it out over time.  The digital slide switch is nearly frictionless and should outlast it’s push button counterparts by a large margin.

Just starting out?  For the money, it is tough to beat the Grundig.  It received the highest Dragon rating from Nuance (as did the Philips and Olympus).  I wish their was a slide switch model, but it does everything extremely well at a market busting price point.

Still not sure?

Call 1-866-408-1383 or email info@americandictation.com.

We are not commissioned salespeople.  We really use this equipment and have personal knowledge of everything we sell.

 

Single Office Workflow

  1. The dictating author records one or more voice files on their desktop recorder.
  2. The digital voice files are automatically copied to the network File Server, and a back-up of each file is made on the attorney's PC. The recorder is then automatically erased and within a few seconds, the author is back at work.
  3. The typist receives an alert that dictation files are now available on the server.
  4. The typist selects the file they wish to transcribe from within their Transcription Software. By selecting a file, others who may be eligible to type are prevented from listening to the voice file, thereby eliminating an unnecessary duplication of work.
  5. Once the voice file is typed, it is moved out of the work queue and archived or deleted at a later time.
  6. The typed documents are stored and shared according to your existing workflow.

Remote Transcription Workflow

Most common in medical offices, a transcriptionist may be working from a remote office or home. Using the built-in Internet transfer functionality of the software, the voice files can be encrypted (for HIPAA compliance) and sent to the Transcriptionist via e-mail or FTP*.

Note: at this time, only the Olympus DSS Player Pro software system can allow the transcriptionist to return typed documents via the same encrypted method by which the voice files are sent.

  1. The dictating author records one or more voice files on their desktop recorder.
  2. The digital voice files are automatically copied to the author's PC. The software will then send the files (encrypted for security purposes, if desired) via e-mail to a selected typist. Alternatively, the files can be transferred by FTP* to an FTP server*. The recorder is then automatically erased and within a few seconds, the author is back at work.
  3. The transcriptionist retrieves the files from their e-mail or FTP server*.
  4. The transcriptionist selects the file they wish to transcribe from within their Transcription Software.
  5. Once the voice file is typed, it is moved out of the work queue and archived or deleted at a later time.
  6. The typed documents may be returned to the author via the Internet (see not above).

There are several considerations to make when choosing which Internet protocol (e-mail or FTP) is best. Talk to an American Dictation Enterprise Specialist at 866-408-1383 for more information.

* American Dictation provides low-cost FTP services for its customers. For more information, contact American Dictation.